Strategic Planning for Wildlife Conservation

“Without a strategy, an organization is like a ship without a rudder, going around in circles… it has no place to go.” Authors Joel Ross and Michael Kami OWP has long advocated for a systems approach to planning. A system is a dynamic process that tends to self-correct and improve …

Lessons Learned about Strategic Planning

When developing strategic plans, keep these tips from OWP members in mind: Process is critical but don’t lose sight of the end. Have an adaptive product that provides direction and guidance. “You can create a great document, but a change in policy, budget or environment can render it obsolete tomorrow,” …

Interest-Based Problem Solving

A fresh approach to resolving issues, which aren’t necessarily deeply rooted, is to apply interest-based problem solving (IBPS) to your conflicts. Instead of fighting out disagreements, the interest-based problem solving model creates an atmosphere to address differences among individuals and groups, according to Julie L. Brockman, Ph.D., Associate Professor at Michigan …

Monarchs: A Global Communications Effort

In the last 20 years, the population of North American monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) has declined by 90 percent. This has led to the creation of the Monarch Joint Venture (MJV), a partnership between federal and state agencies, non-governmental agencies, and academic programs working together to protect monarchs and their …

Communicating Effectively about Wildlife Conservation

Whether it is working with lawmakers, garnering public support, briefing reporters or encouraging behavioral shifts among a group of people, the ability to communicate clearly and effectively is one of the most important aspects of conserving wildlife species and habitats. Many scientists, however, tend to be knowledgeable about analytical thinking …

The Role of Trust in Conflicts

Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is a chronic bacterial disease of cattle that can affect other mammals, including humans. Michigan is the only state in the United States where bTB is sustained in the free-ranging deer population, and the primary effects of the disease are on the cattle industry. To prevent transmission …

Communicating Politicized Topics

From climate change to gray wolves to various environmental protection laws, fish and wildlife agencies often find themselves dealing with issues that have become politicized because of important disagreements about them. Brad Miley of the Human Dimensions Branch of USFWS National Wildlife Refuge System explains, “Operating in a landscape of …

Dealing Effectively with Conflict in Wildlife Conservation

Every fish and wildlife management agency must address a wide variety of conflicts on a regular basis. Indeed, the ability to effectively conserve and manage many wildlife species is closely tied to the competence of fish and wildlife managers in addressing these conflicts successfully. That’s why this article is dedicated …

Community-based Deer Management: Planning for Success

As expanding populations of white-tailed deer and their associated interactions with humans result in an acute array of ecological, economic, and human health and safety impacts, municipalities across much of the Northeastern, Mid-Atlantic and Midwestern states have been developing deer management programs to address these impacts locally.